PA Ideological Era (1961-1965)

The physician assistant (PA) profession emerged in the mid-1960s as a social innovation to help physicians meet a growing demand for health care services. After the Second World War, the United States began educating more medical and surgical specialist than generalist physicians. Access to primary health services became limited at a time of growing social unrest that proclaimed health care as a right of all citizens. Some physicians began training their own “assistants” to help with the work load. States passed laws to allow them to delegate medical task to these proprietary trained assistants. Dr. Charles Hudson challenged the American Medical Association (AMA) to create and support the training of a new health professional that could be educated in less time, at less expense and be deployed rapidly to assist overworked physicians, especially in primary care practices. The idea of using non-physicians to provide medical services was not new; examples included the use of corpsman and medics in the military and the use of Feldshers in Russia and Barefoot Doctors in China.

Parent Collections (1)

Total Works (12)

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Starting Physician's Assistant Training Program at Duke University - 1964 Correspondence: Stead to Finkelstein and Stead to Ballentine

1964
Letters from Eugene A. Stead, Jr. dated August 18, 1964, to Dr. Elliot Finkelstein, US Public Health Service and September 24, 1964 to Mr. Robert...
 

Correspondence from Freeman to Stead and Stead to Freeman regarding starting Physician's Assistant Training Program at Duke University - Correspondence: Freeman to Stead and Stead to Freeman

October, 1964
Dr. Ruth Freeman, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health writes Dr. Eugene Stead, Jr. a letter dated October 13, 1964...
 

Physician's Assistant Program: Ad Hoc committee report

May, 1965
This is the report of an ad hoc committee appointed by Dr. Barnes Woodhall, Vice Provost, Duke University to evaluate "programs within the Medical...
 

Correspondence from Eugene Stead to Barnes Woodhall regarding starting Physician's Assistant Training Program at Duke University - Correspondence: Stead to Woodhall

March 23, 1965
Memorandum dated March 23, 1965 from Dr. Eugene A. Stead, Jr. to Dr. Barnes Woodhall, Vice Provost for Medical Affairs at Duke University, stating...
 

Correspondence from Eugene Stead to Everett Hopkins regarding starting a Physician's Assistant Training Program at Duke University - Correspondence: Stead to Hopkins

August 21, 1964
A 1964 letter from Eugene A. Stead, Jr. to Everett Hopkins, Vice President for Planning and Institutional Studies at Duke University stating that...
 

Operation Breakthrough, Economics Opportunity Act, Grant [Duke University PA Program] - Correspondence: Mau to Woodhall and Anlyan

October 2, 1964
This memorandum dated October 2, 1964 was sent by Department of Medicine Administrator, Jim Mau, to Dr. Woodhall and Dr. Anlyan, Duke University to...
 

The Physician's Assistant

July 1, 1964
A working paper dated July 1, 1964 written by Dr. Eugene A. Stead, Jr. describing the need for physician's assistants. He states the minimum...
 

Starting Physician's Assistant Training Program at Duke University - Internal Correspondence: Stead to Frenzel

April 21, 1964
A 1964 letter from Eugene A. Stead, Jr. to Charles H. Frenzel at Duke Hospital expressing desire to meet to discuss establishing an educational...
 

Minutes of the Hyperbaric Operating Committee [Duke University]; 4 October 1965

October 4, 1965
These minutes of the Hyperbaric Operating Committee, Duke University Medical Center, dated October 4, 1965 states that the "formal portion of the...
 

Minutes of the Hyperbaric Operating Committee [Duke University]; March 30, 1965

March 30, 1965
These minutes of the Hyperbaric Operating Committee, Duke University Medical Center, dated March 30, 1965 make reference to two recently awarded...